Gear Reviews

DrinkTanks: Take your micro brew To-Go

If stereotypes have any truth to them, then I know fly fishermen and beer go together like peas and carrots. This is why I want to tell you about one of my new favorite pieces of gear I use to tote my favorite craft brew to the river. DrinkTanks makes one bad a** piece of gear. Currently I have the 64oz growler version but plan on expanding that to their 128oz version very soon. Each tank is insulated ensuring that your beer stays frosty cold for over 24 hours. So when your favorite micro brew doesn’t distribute, then fill ‘er up on the way to camp. The way the lid locks on to the top with the dual clamp system prevents any leaks and I mean ANY leaks.   Which brings me to my next point. If you spend the extra few pennies, you can get their Keg Cap kit. I mean sure you could just take the lid off of your Drink Tank, but why not get the complete experience. What makes the Keg Cap so cool, is you get a little CO2 injector that allows you to add CO2 to the empty space in your tank. Not only does this keep your beer from going flat, but it also pressurizes the tank allowing you to utilize the pour spout. Not to mention it adds a level of panache that you just can’t get with other drink management systems. One point that I would like to make, is MAKE SURE YOU POUR YOURSELF AT LEAST 1 BEER BEFORE YOU USE THE CO2 INJECTOR. I never thought I would ever have to write this but failure to do so will result in explaining to your family why you have to clean beer off the ceiling. Now...

Orvis Waterproof Hip Pack: No More Soggy Crackers

There are two things I love in this world more than anything else, wet wading and sitting on the side of the river with a gourmet combination of whole wheat crackers and peanut butter. The problem with that is, crackers and water don't mix. At least until I found this pack. So for anyone that knows me, I've tried fishing vests, sling packs, backpacks, hip packs, you name it. I've found that for my usage, hip packs tend to be the most comfortable while on the water.  So far the only issue I really have is I tend to wade through some deep water and well... get all of the contents of my pack soaked. Including my crackers.  Well I have that problem no longer. I have been using the Orvis waterproof hip pack for some time and I can tell you with the upmost confidence that it is in fact waterproof. Literally to the extent that I even keep my dslr camera in it which alone has saved it from numerous watery graves. Which brings me to my first point. This pack is roomy for a hip pack. Straight away when moving over from my Ledges 650 which has a few dividers in the main cavity of the backpack, the Orvis pack has one big area for you to store all of your gear. This is insanely beneficial to me as sometimes I want to carry extra spools to swap between the day if I am fishing salt flats or streamers on the river.  Inside the main pocket however, there are a few mesh pockets for smaller items like spare leaders and strike indicators. Theres even a larger zippered pocket for your cell pho...

Outer Limit Supply 6500 Outback : The gear review that could save your life.

This gear review is on an important piece of gear that I think is often overlooked. I will plan/daydream for days before a big trip about the gear I need to take. This mostly falls in the category of fly fishing core essentials like what weight rods I will need and, reels with spare spools for streamer tip or full sinking lines, flies for the area and countless other things that are running through my mind before a trip. The thing that often gets overlooked as we gather our fishing or outdoor gear is a comprehensive first aid kit. My trips often involve taking my Family friends and sometimes the dog well off of the beaten path and far away from medical care. We could be on a multi-day float trip or just that remote secret spot that took 3 hours to 4-wheel to and another hour hike. Because of the remote places, we fish and Hunt and my desire to be prepared and self-sufficient, I went in search of a first aid kit that would meet the needs of our group when in the outdoors.  I found the Outback 6500 kit from Outer Limit  Supply to be the best out there for my needs. Now I'm not a medical professional and having this first aid kit does not make me one, but I have found after going through the kit to familiarize my self with it that is not as overwhelming as if first seemed. Let's look at what inside and what I like and dislike about it. Inside you will find the supplies can be broken down into three categories  Dressings, Tools and Medications. The dressings included the stan...

Ty-rite, The Pen is mightier than... lost flies?

Almost everyone I have fished with has at one point struggled to tie a fly on, it’s not an age thing or being able to see well thing, it’s just a thing that happens to everyone at some point. Even I sometimes struggle to tie on small flies it could be the size of the hook like a 20 or smaller or the wind and lack of finger dexterity due to cold weather whatever the case is, it happens to us all. Well we got a product in our hands that seems to have the solution to this problem, and it’s called the Ty-rite. The Ty-rite is a great little tool that hangs on a lanyard or pack or will clip on a shirt pocket.  This little device is a small spring-operated assistant for holding and tying on small flies. Well, any shape and size flies really. The Ty-rite at first looks like a stubby a ballpoint pen. But looks are deceiving this is nothing like a ballpoint pen. Instead of hosting ink at its end it has a little hook that extends when the button on the other end is depressed. This hook on the Ty-rite goes around the bend of the hook on your fly and holds it tightly against the tool so you can tie it on the line without struggling. I found it easy to use, and when tying the clinch knot, it was very easy to spin the Ty-Rite 4-5 times and then slip the tag end through the loop to tighten the knot.  Pros: Small and light, easy to store and access Made in the USA Seems like it will last Solves a problem for everyone, but especially our more seasoned fishing buddies. Cons: Looks like a ...