Tips & Tricks

DIY Fly Box for under $5

There are many different reasons to make your own fly box. Maybe you don't have the scratch for the newest $35 Umpqua fly box, or you're looking for something light for your backcountry excursions. This is where the trusty Altoids tin comes in handy. For years people have been saving onto and re-purposing these curiously strong tins and now fly fishing is no exception. In this guide, we will show you how to turn your tin into a rigid and reliable fly box for a low cost.  Materials: Altoids Tin Thin Cardboard Duct TapeOptional: Magnetic Tape Velcro   Step 1: Start by prepping your Altoids tin Firstly, make sure all of the mint dust is out of that tin! Its no secret that fish have adapted an exquisite sense of smell. if you go by throwing your flies in a pile of mint dust, your flies will naturally pick up this smell. Simply rinse out your tin in warm water and soap until everything is washed out. As an optional added step, use rubbing alcohol to ensure that there are no residues left behind in the washing process.  Step 2: Creating the dividers Starting with your cardboard, we are going to cut dividers for your tin. For the length of your box, cut a strip of cardboard that measures 3 1/2" x 3/4". For the width of your box, cut two strips that measure 2 1/8" x 3/4". With these three strips cut out, take your length strip (3.5") and make 2 cuts half way through the strip so that each of the three sections measure 1 3/4". The strips that measure the width of your box cut...

Big fish, Little mind

As we near the end of the year and the seasons change, the avid fly fisher knows that right now can be some of the best fishing of the calendar year. Some may credit this to the temperature changes, some to the aggressive browns looking to put on some weight pre/post spawn, but really we all know it’s STREAMER TIME! Streamers are becoming more and more popular and if you’re neglecting this tactic of chasing big fish then you’re missing out! It’s a great way to find and chase the bigger population of a river system and many would agree it’s the most exciting. Now, were all in chase of that big once in a lifetime fish, but before doing so do you ever think about the small fish and where they might be? This is where my theory “Big Fish, Little Mind” stems from. Before we can try and catch the big predatorial fish we’ve got to think like a small fish.                 Thinking like the small ones can be a bit difficult but here are some places to start on your next outing. Before you even get your feet wet, fish the first 10ft of water out from the bank back to the shore. In most cases that’s the softest water and most of the juvenile fish will be feeding on small bugs. During a hatch some small fish make themselves vulnerable to bigger fish by concentrating on eating and not the two foot brown below him just waiting for an easy opportunity. Another great place to locate big fish while thinking like a small one is near current change and slack water. This may be behind structur...